VOLCÁN LÁSCAR

Fotografía: Caspar Ammann

A January 6, 2002 ASTER nighttime thermal infrared image of Chiliques volcano in Chile (left) shows a hot spot in the summit crater and several others along the upper flanks of the edifice, indicating new volcanic activity. Examination of an earlier nighttime thermal infrared image from May 24, 2000 showed no thermal anomaly. Chiliques volcano was previously thought to be dormant. Rising to an elevation of 5778 m, Chiliques is a simple stratovolcano with a 500-m-diameter circular summit crater. This mountain is one of the most important high altitude ceremonial centers of the Incas. It is rarely visited due to its difficult accessibility. Climbing to the summit along Inca trails, numerous ruins are encountered; at the summit there are a series of constructions used for rituals. There is a beautiful lagoon in the crater that is almost always frozen. 

The daytime image (right) was acquired on November 19, 2000 and was created by displaying ASTER bands 1,2 and 3 in blue, green and red. The nighttime image was acquired January 6, 2002, and is a color-coded display of a single thermal infrared band. The hottest areas are white, and colder areas are darker shades of red. Both images cover an area of 7.5 x 7.5 km, and are centered at 23.6 degrees south latitude, 67.6 degrees west longitude.

En la actualidad el volcán Lascar presenta actividad fumarólica cuyo origen parece ser íntegramente magmatico, sin evidencias de que exista un sistema hidrotermal (Tassi et al., 2007).

https://asterweb.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery-detail.asp?name=Andean